Marknadsföring av alkohol
i Sverige och i EU:
en fråga om proportionalitet.

Inom ramen för juristprogrammet skrev jag våren 2018 mitt examensarbete om hur alkohol får marknadsföras i Sverige och i EU. Nedan följer en kort sammanfattning på engelska (abstract). Vill du läsa uppsatsen i sin helhet? Klicka på knappen längst ned på den här sidan.


In 2012, alcohol was the third leading risk factor for disease and mortality in Europe, after tobacco and high blood pressure.

The EU region has the highest alcohol consumption in the entire world - in 2016, the average consumption of alcohol across the EU amounted to 10 litres of pure alcohol per adult. During that same year, the alcohol consumption in Sweden, specifically, amounted to approximately nine litres of pure alcohol per adult. In 2012, alcohol was the third leading risk factor for disease and mortality in Europe, after tobacco and high blood pressure.

The aim of this thesis is to describe, and then analyse, European and Swedish policies regarding the advertising of alcohol. This will be done by analysing different sources of law, perhaps most notably case law.
How do policies within these two jurisdictions relate to each other?

The aim of this thesis is to describe, and then analyse, European and Swedish policies regarding the advertising of alcohol. [...] How do policies within these two jurisdictions relate to each other?

Within the EU, principles of the free market and proportionality have long been given priority over ideas of public health. Alcohol has, for a long time, simply been considered an agricultural product among many others. The Court of Justice of the European Union has, however, in more recent decisions, shown an increased willingness to acknowledge the negative consequences of excessive drinking.

In Sweden, on the other hand, public health has been a priority since the 19th century, when seemingly draconian restrictions were placed on the manufacturing of alcohol in order to curb rampant alcoholism. Since becoming a member of the EU, Sweden’s legislation on alcohol advertising has, however, become increasingly liberal.

The conclusions that can be drawn are that the EU and Sweden are, at least partly, moving in opposite directions regarding alcohol advertising. In an ever-changing media landscape, a higher degree of cooperation across borders might be necessary.